DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & MENTAL HYGIENE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES

Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201 - 2399


[photo, Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, Maryland] Established in 1987, Public Health Services directs three administrations: Laboratories; Prevention and Health Promotion; and Vital Statistics. Public Health Services also oversees local health departments and is responsible for the Office of Chief Medical Examiner, the Office of Controlled Substances Administration, the Office of Health Care Quality, the Office of Population Health Improvement, the Office of Preparedness and Response, and the State Anatomy Board. Public Health Services also is aided by the Health and Human Services Referral Board.

Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, Maryland, March 2004. Photo by Diane F. Evartt.


LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS
Administration of local health departments preceded the organization of a State health department by nearly a century, when, in 1793, Baltimore City established a health office to stop an epidemic of yellow fever. The first county health department was formed by Allegany County in 1922. Each Maryland county by 1934 had established its own health department. State oversight of local departments was conducted within the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene by the Local Health Services Administration formed in 1969. The Administration reorganized by 1973 as the Local Health and Professional Support Services Administration and, by 1977, as the Local Health Administration. The latter reformed into the Local and Family Health Administration in 1989. That administration was renamed the Community and Public Health Administration in 1997, and reorganized as the Community Health Administration in 2001. From 2001 to 2009, local health departments were overseen by the Community Health Administration. Beginning in July 2009, their oversight became the direct responsibility of the Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services.

To ensure that basic public health services are provided in all parts of Maryland, the Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services oversees the local health departments in each county and Baltimore City. Under direction of a local health officer, each local health department provides these services and administers and enforces State and local health laws and regulations in its jurisdiction. Programs meet the public health needs of the community and provide services not offered by the private sector. The local health officer is appointed jointly by the Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene and the local governing body.

CHIEF OF STAFF


DEER'S HEAD CENTER
P. O. Box 2018, Emerson Ave., Salisbury, MD 21802 - 2018

Authorized in 1945, Deer's Head Center was established in 1950 (Chapter 994, Acts of 1945). The Center joined the Community and Public Health Administration in January 1997, and transferred to the Family Health Administration in July 2001 (Code Health-General Article, sec. 19-502). In July 2012, the Center moved to the Health Systems and Infrastructure Administration.

The Center is a regional facility for the chronically ill and elderly adults in need of medical and rehabilitation services or general medical care for chronic disease or terminal illness. It also operates a kidney dialysis facility for area residents.

In FY2010, the Center was licensed for 66 hospital beds, providing the services of a chronic disease hospital (including a small hospice service) and 80 long-term nursing home care beds, as well as outpatient and end-stage kidney dialysis, and outpatient rehabilitation therapy. Also in FY2010, the Center provided 14,786 dialysis treatments to 158 patients.

WESTERN MARYLAND CENTER
1500 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown, MD 21740

Western Maryland Center began as Western Maryland State Hospital. Authorized in 1952, the Hospital opened in 1957 (Chapter 53, Acts of 1952). The Center was made part of the Community and Public Health Administration in January 1997, and moved to the Family Health Administration in July 2001. In July 2012, it became part of the Health Systems and Infrastructure Administration.

The Center provides chronic or rehabilitation hospital care, and comprehensive or nursing home care. The Center also offers adult day care; end-stage kidney dialysis services; and physical, occupational and speech rehabilitation to outpatients. It has 60 licensed hospital beds and 63 licensed comprehensive care beds (Code Health-General Article, sec. 19-502).

LOCAL PUBLIC HEALTH FUNDING
By law, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene annually provides matching funds to Maryland's twenty-four local health departments for certain health services. These cover administration and communication; adult health promotion; child health; communicable disease services; environment; family planning; geriatric services; maternal health; and wellness. Funding for these core public health services transferred from the Family Health Administration to the Health Systems and Infrastructure Administration in July 2012.

Core Public Health Services Funding Program. This program provides matching State funds to local health departments for vital programs, such as communicable disease control, maternal and child health services, and environmental health.

OFFICE OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ADMINISTRATION

4201 Patterson Ave., 4th floor, Baltimore, MD 21215 - 2299

In 1951, the Office of Controlled Substances Administration originated as the Division of Drug Control within the Bureau of Environmental Hygiene. Later transferred to the Office of Licensing and Certification, the Division of Drug Control reorganized in 1987 as the Office of Drug Control and joined the Community Health Surveillance and Laboratories Administration. The Office became part of the Laboratories Administration in 1997 and resumed its original name in November 2004. In November 2015, the Division moved directly under the Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services, and in July 2016, restructured under its present name.

The Office enforces the Controlled Dangerous Substance Act, and ensures the availability of drugs for legitimate medical and scientific purposes while working to prevent drug abuse (Code Criminal Law Article, secs. 5-101 through 5-505). Office programs focus on physicians, dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, manufacturers, distributors, pharmacies, and nonpharmacy establishments.

OFFICE OF HEALTH CARE QUALITY

Bland Bryant Building, Maple Street, Spring Grove Hospital Center, Catonsville, MD 21228

The Office of Health Care Quality started in 1971 as the Division of Licensing and Certification under the Office of General Administration and reorganized in 1986 as the Office of Licensing and Certification Programs. In 1987, it was renamed the Licensing and Certification Administration. As the Office of Quality Assurance, it transferred from Health Care Policy, Finance, and Regulation and was placed under the Office of Secretary in March 1999. The Office received its present name in September 1999, then moved under Regulatory Programs in August 2005, and under the Office of Secretary in November 2009. It again moved in August 2015 to Regulatory Programs, and in January 2016 to Public Health Services.

All hospitals and health-related institutions in Maryland must be licensed by the Office. The quality of care and compliance with both State and federal regulations in 8,000 health-care facilities and health-related services and programs is monitored by the Office. These include: adult daycare centers; ambulatory surgical facilities; assisted-living programs; birthing centers; developmental disabilities programs; dialysis centers; group homes; health maintenance organizations (HMOs); home health agencies; hospice programs, hospitals; independent physical therapists; major medical equipment; medical laboratories; mental health programs; nursing homes and rehabilitation centers; prison hospitals; residential service agencies; residential treatment centers; substance abuse programs; and other miscellaneous programs. To regulate these institutions and programs, the Office conducts more than 10,000 inspections yearly.

For all health facilities participating in the Medical Assistance Program (Medicaid) and Medicare, the Office is responsible for inspection and certification recommendations. Administrative actions against facilities that violate State rules and regulations are initiated by the Office.

The Office consists of Policy and Administration, and two divisions: Federal Programs, and State Programs.

POLICY & ADMINISTRATION
For the Office of Health Care Quality, Policy and Administration develops policy, operational procedures, regulations, budgets, and legislation. Policy and Administration also oversees the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) and Hospital Licensure Program.

FEDERAL PROGRAMS DIVISION
The Federal Programs Division originated as the Long-Term Care Program within the Licensing and Certification Administration before it reformed in 1992 as Long-Term Care, Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Programs. In 1995, it became the Long-Term Care Program, which evaluated and surveyed nursing homes, adult day-care centers, and licensed and registered domiciliary-care homes. In 2001, it reorganized as the Federal Programs Division.

This division is responsible for licensure of adult medical daycare, ambulatory care facilities, laboratories, and nursing homes.

Ambulatory Care Program. This program started as the Hospitals and Ambulatory Care Program. It reorganized in 1995 as the Developmental Disabilities and Ambulatory Care Program, and adopted its present name in 1997.

The Program reviews State and federal programs involving home health agencies, hospices, health maintenance organizations, major medical equipment, ambulatory care facilities, residential service agencies, and dialysis centers.

Laboratory Program. Formerly under the Office of Health Care Quality, the Laboratory Program later transferred to the Federal Programs Division.

The Laboratory Program evaluates and surveys some 2,000 laboratories, including physician office laboratories, to determine compliance with State and federal laws and regulations. The Program also coordinates and manages the State and federal Cytology Proficiency Testing Program for individuals who interpret pap smears.

STATE PROGRAMS DIVISION
Functions of the State Programs Division began in 1992 as the Long-Term Care Program, the Community Mental Health Program, and the Substance Abuse Program. The work of these units was reorganized in 1995 into two units, and thereafter the Substance Abuse and Community Mental Health Program formed. In 1995, the Developmental Disabilities and Ambulatory Care Program also was created. Its ambulatory care functions were reassigned in 1997. That program reorganized as the Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse and Community Mental Health Program in 1997, and became the State Programs Division in 2001.

The State Programs Division oversees licensure of assisted-living facilities, developmental disabilities facilities, and mental health programs. The Division also certifies substance abuse programs, and evaluates community residential and day programs for the developmentally disabled.

All residential and nonresidential health-related services and programs for the mentally impaired and the alcohol and drug addicted are evaluated by the Division. The Division also manages the licensure of private review agents doing business in Maryland. Private review agents are third parties (often employed by insurance companies) who (in advance) approve or disapprove medical procedures to be covered by insurance.

OFFICE OF POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT


LABORATORIES ADMINISTRATION

J. Mehsen Joseph Public Health Laboratory
Baltimore Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins
1770 Ashland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205

The Laboratories Administration was made part of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene as the Community Health Surveillance and Laboratories Administration in 1987 and received its present name in January 1997.

Broad responsibilities for laboratory testing to help physicians and health officials prevent, diagnose, and control human diseases are assigned to the Laboratories Administration. It also performs examinations in connection with the enforcement of State health laws, and the chemical, microbiological, and radiological surveillance of the environment related to foods, waters, sewage, air, pharmaceuticals, and hazardous wastes. Laboratory tests are conducted to support State occupational safety and health regulations and to enforce pure food and drug laws.

To ensure the quality of laboratory services, the Administration develops standards and regulations for medical laboratories, tissue banks, and physician office laboratories. Moreover, it certifies and periodically inspects laboratories that examine water and dairy products for shipment out of Maryland.

In April 2015, the Administration moved from the Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, to its present location.

In addition to a central laboratory in Baltimore and two regional laboratories, the Laboratories Administration oversees the Office of Laboratory Emergency Preparedness and Response, as well as Administrative and Support Services, and Scientific Programs. The Administration is assisted by the Laboratory Advisory Committee.

OFFICE OF LABORATORY EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & RESPONSE
In July 2002, the Office of Laboratory Emergency Preparedness and Response was organized within the Laboratories Administration as the Laboratory Bioterrorism Office. It was reorganized under its present name in November 2004. The Office develops procedures, trains staff, and coordinates State efforts to prepare for and respond to a bioterrorism attack. The Office also oversees the Biological Agents Registry.

ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT SERVICES

In November 2004, Administrative and Support Services formed as Regulatory and Administrative Programs to oversee the Division of Drug Control and six offices: Continuing Education and Training; Information Management Services; Laboratory Support Services; Quality Systems and Maintenance; Safety and Security; and Special Projects and Regulatory Programs. Under its current name, it reorganized in July 2012.

Today, Administrative and Support Services oversees four offices: Information Management Services; Laboratory Support Services; Quality Systems and Maintenance; and Safety and Training.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMS

In November 2004, Scientific Programs was created to oversee the two regional laboratories and six divisions: Environmental Chemistry; Environmental Microbiology; Molecular Biology; Newborn and Childhood Screening; Public Health Microbiology; and Virology and Immunology.

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION
To help monitor and enforce environmental and consumer product safety laws, the Environmental Chemistry Division tests air, beverages, drugs, drinking water, foods, pharmaceuticals, sediments, sludges, soils, wastewater, and local flora and fauna. Tests are conducted to detect potentially toxic pollutants, such as pesticides, radioactivity, metals, and organic and inorganic compounds. For consumer safety, products are tested for tampering, characterization, and nutritional labeling.

ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY DIVISION
The Environmental Microbiology Division tests for disease-causing microorganisms in drinking water, swimming water, sewage treatment water, foods, shellfish and shellfish waters, and dairy products. Also, the Division certifies laboratories to test water, shellfish, and dairy products.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DIVISION
In the Molecular Biology Division, testing is carried out for HIV, rabies, West Nile virus, and other pathogens.

Five sections perform the Division's work: Molecular Diagnostics; Molecular Epidemiology; Molecular Imaging and Analysis; DNA Sequencing; and Rabies Zoonosis.

NEWBORN & CHILDHOOD SCREENING DIVISION
For every baby born in Maryland, the Newborn and Childhood Screening Division offers testing for numerous hereditary disorders. These include biotinidase deficiency; congenital adrenal hyperplasis; galactosemia; homocystinuria; maple syrup urine disease (MSUD); neonatal hypothyroidism; phenylketonuria (PKU); sickle cell anemia and other hemoglobinopathies; and tyrosinemia. As part of the State's Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, the Division also tests children's blood for elevated lead levels and environmental samples for lead contamination.

PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY DIVISION
The Public Health Microbiology Division began as the Division of Diagnostic and Public Health Microbiology and assumed its current name in November 2004. The Division provides diagnostic services, including processing patient specimens, recovering and identifying infectious agents, and assisting physicians in delivering proper antimicrobial therapy. For Maryland health care providers and institutions, the Division indentifies and confirms microbial agents: enteric and diarrheal; foodborne, fungal; gonococcal; parasitic; pertussis; and tuberculosis. These agents cause various diseases.

Four sections comprise the Division: Bacteriology; Mycobacteriology; Mycology; and Parisitology.

VIROLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY DIVISION
To detect viral and certain bacterial agents that cause diseases in humans, the Virology and Immunology Division conducts serological assays to determine the effectiveness of vaccines for hepatitis, measles, mumps, polio, rubella, and varicella. The Division conducts surveillance testing for sexually transmitted diseases; does cell culture isolations for epidemiological studies of respiratory virus outbreaks; and analyzes animal-borne agents, such as Hantaviruses, Lyme disease, rabies, and arboviruses, including encephalitis.


[photo, 500 North Calvert St., Baltimore, Maryland]

PREVENTION & HEALTH PROMOTION ADMINISTRATION

500 North Calvert St., 5th floor, Baltimore, MD 21202

The Prevention and Health Promotion Administration was formed from the merger in July 2012 of the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration, and the Family Health Administration.

Infectious Disease & Environmental Health Administration. The Infectious Disease & Environmental Health Administration started in July 2009 with the merger of the AIDS Administration and the Community Health Administration. It was responsible for environmental health programs, food control services, HIV care services, infectious disease prevention and reporting, outbreak response, and regulatory programs.

500 North Calvert St., Baltimore, Maryland, February 2004. Photo by Diane F. Evartt.


One component forming the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration was the AIDS Administration. It was created in 1987 as the AIDS Control Administration, and became the AIDS Administration in 1988. Its purpose was to educate the public and health care professionals about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV), monitor the disease in Maryland, and provide services for persons with AIDS or infected with HIV. In July 2009, the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration assumed its responsibilities.

The other component that helped to make the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration was the Community Health Administration. It originated in 1969 as the Local Health Services Administration. By 1973, it reorganized as the Local Health and Professional Support Services Administration and, by 1977, as the Local Health Administration. The Local Health Administration and the Family Health Administration merged in 1989 to form the Local and Family Health Administration. In January 1997, the Administration reformed as the Community and Public Health Administration. That administration divided into the Community Health Administration and the Family Health Administration in July 2001. Functions of the Community Health Administration transferred in July 2009 to the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration.

Family Health Administration. The other forerunner of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration was the Family Health Administration. The Family Health Administration worked to prevent and control chronic diseases; prevent injuries; provides public health information; and promotes healthy behaviors in Marylanders. Further, it strove to ensure that quality health care services are available, especially for at-risk and vulnerable people. The Administration also oversaw programs for maternal and child health; family planning and reproductive health; cancer control; oral health; and tobacco use prevention.

The Family Health Administration also was responsible for the Center for Cancer Surveillance and Control; the Center for Health Promotion and Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation; and the Center for Maternal and Child Health. In addition, the Administration oversees five offices: Chronic Disease Prevention; Genetics and Children with Special Health Care Needs; Health Policy and Planning; Oral Health; and Women, Infants and Children Food Program. In July 2010, the Administration restructured into two deputy directorates: Family Health Services, and Prevention and Disease Control.

Prevention & Health Promotion Administration. Initially, the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration was organized under four bureaus: Cancer and Chronic Disease; Environmental Health; Infectious Disease; and Maternal and Child Health. In April 2015, it restructured with five bureaus: Environmental Health; Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Outbreak Response; Infectious Disease Prevention and Care Services; Maternal and Child Health; and Primary Care and Community Health.

PRIMARY CARE & COMMUNITY HEALTH BUREAU

The Primary Care and Community Health Bureau started as Prevention and Disease Control. Within the Family Health Administration, Prevention and Disease Control was established in July 2010. It was responsible for two centers: Cancer Surveillance and Control; and Health Promotion and Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation, as well as two offices: Chronic Disease Prevention; and Health Policy and Planning. In July 2012, Prevention and Disease Control reorganized as the Cancer and Chronic Disease Bureau under the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration. In April 2015, the Bureau restructured as the Primary Care and Community Health Bureau.

The Bureau is responsible for the Office of Oral Health, the Office of Primary Care Access, and three centers: Cancer Prevention and Control; Chronic Disease Prevention and Control; and Tobacco Prevention and Control.

CENTER FOR CANCER PREVENTION & CONTROL
The Center for Cancer Prevention and Control began as the Center for Cancer Surveillance and Control, which formed under the Community and Public Health Administration in January 2000. The Center for Cancer Surveillance and Control joined the Family Health Administration in July 2001. At that time, it assumed functions of the former Division of Cancer Control from the Office of Chronic Disease Prevention, as well as oversight of the Maryland Cancer Registry. In July 2012, the Center reorganized under its present name as part of the Cancer and Chronic Disease Bureau. In April 2015, it became part of the Primary Care and Community Health Bureau.

The Center plans, develops, and implements initiatives to reduce deaths and disabilities due to cancer.

MARYLAND CANCER REGISTRY
The Maryland Cancer Registry was initiated in July 1982. Formerly under the Department of the Environment, the Registry transferred to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in 1991.

The Registry is an incidence-based electronic database containing demographic, diagnostic and treatment data on Maryland residents and those nonresidents who are diagnosed or treated in Maryland (Code Health-General Article, sec. 18-204). Under contractual agreement with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Registry is operated by Tri-Analytics, Inc., of Bel Air, Maryland.

CENTER FOR CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION & CONTROL
Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Room 300, Baltimore, MD 21201

The Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control organized in the 1960s as the Regional Medical Program and later became the Adult Health Program. When the Local and Family Health Administration formed in 1989, the Program reformed under it as the Office of Chronic Disease Prevention. The Office transferred to the Community and Public Health Administration in 1997, and became the Office of Chronic Disease Prevention and Public Health Residency Program under the Family Health Administration in 2001. It combined with the Office of Injury and Disability Prevention to form the Center for Preventive Health Services in May 2003. In June 2008, the Center was renamed again as the Office of Chronic Disease Prevention. In July 2012, the Office reorganized under its present name as part of the Cancer and Chronic Disease Bureau of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration. In April 2015, it moved under the Primary Care and Community Health Bureau.

CENTER FOR TOBACCO PREVENTION & CONTROL
300 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201


[photo, 300 West Preston St., Baltimore, Maryland] In November 1993, the Center for Health Promotion and Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation formed from the Division of Health Education as the Office of Health Promotion, Education, and Tobacco Use Prevention. Under the Community and Public Health Administration, it was renamed the Office of Health Promotion, Education, and Tobacco Control in 1997. Under the Family Health Administration, it became the Center for Health Promotion, Education, and Tobacco Use Prevention by 2004, the Center for Health Promotion and Education in July 2009, and the Center for Health Promotion and Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation in January 2011. In July 2012, it reorganized under its present name as part of the Cancer and Chronic Disease Bureau. In April 2015, it joined the Primary Care and Community Health Bureau.

300 West Preston St., Baltimore, Maryland, December 2000. Photo by Diane F. Evartt.


OFFICE OF ORAL HEALTH
Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201

The Office of Oral Health focuses on improving the oral health of Marylanders, preventing oral diseases and injuries, and increasing their access to oral health care. The Office develops educational materials, including brochures on oral cancer, brushing and flossing techniques, healthy eating habits, and a children's guide to healthy oral habits. The Office also grants local health departments funds to develop oral health education and prevention programs and for community water fluoridation.

To increase the number of dentists serving in Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas, the Office works with the University of Maryland Dental School.

Under the Office is the Maryland Dental-Care Loan Assistance Repayment Program.

OFFICE OF PRIMARY CARE ACCESS
In April 2015, the Office of Primary Care Access moved from the Health Systems and Infrastructure Administration to the Primary Care and Community Health Bureau.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH BUREAU

The Office of Environmental Health and Food Protection organized in July 2009 to oversee the Center for Environmental Health Coordination and the Office of Food Protection and Consumer Health Services. In July 2012, it reorganized as the Environmental Health Bureau.

The Bureau oversees the Office of Food Protection and four centers: Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology; Healthy Homes and Community Services; Injury and Sexual Assault Prevention; and Injury Epidemiology.

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

CENTER FOR HEALTHY HOMES & COMMUNITY SERVICES

CENTER FOR INJURY & SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION

CENTER FOR INJURY EPIDEMIOLOGY


[photo, Cow and workers, Milking Parlor, Cow Palace, Maryland State Fair, Timonium, Maryland] OFFICE OF FOOD PROTECTION
6 St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD 21202

The Office of Food Protection started as the Office of Food and Product Health. It was renamed the Office of Food Protection and Consumer Health Services in 1988 under the Community Health Surveillance and Laboratories Administration. In 1997, it reorganized as Consumer Health and Facility Services under the Community and Public Health Administration, joined the Community Health Administration in July 2001, and the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration in July 2009. In July 2012, it reorganized under its present name within the Environmental Health Bureau of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration.

Cow & workers, Milking Parlor, Cow Palace, Maryland State Fair, Timonium, Maryland, September 2015. Photo by Sarah A. Hanks.


By eliminating or minimizing exposure to or consumption of unsafe commodities and substances, the Office prevents disease, disability, and death. It controls the manufacture, distribution, and sale of milk, food, and consumer products. In addition, it establishes and enforces regulations regarding campgrounds and youth camps, migratory labor camps, mobile home parks, outdoor music festivals, and swimming pools.

The Office is responsible for four centers: Facility and Process Review; Food Defense and Emergency Response; Food Processing; and Milk and Dairy Product Safety. The Youth Camp Safety Advisory Council assists the Office.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY & OUTBREAK RESPONSE BUREAU

In July 2012, the Infectious Disease Bureau formed within the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration. In a restructuring in April 2015, tje Infectious Disease Bureau split into two bureaus: Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Outbreak Response; and Infectious Disease Prevention and Care Services.

The Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Outbreak Response Bureau assumed the duties of the Office of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Outbreak Response. That Office was initiated as the Office of Epidemiology and Disease Control, which began under the Community Health Surveillance and Laboratories Administration. That administration became the Community and Public Health Administration in 1997, and the Community Health Administration in July 2001. After the latter reformed as the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration in July 2009, the Office of Epidemiology and Disease Control was renamed the Office of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Outbreak Response in August 2009. In July 2012, the Office became part of the Infectious Disease Bureau of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration.

The Bureau works to control all communicable diseases affecting people in Maryland. The Bureau strives to contain hard-to-control diseases, such as hepatitis, influenza, sexually-transmitted diseases, and rabies. It also works to control acute communicable diseases, tuberculosis, nosocomial infections, and animal-borne diseases transmittable to humans. In addition, the Bureau supervises health programs for refugees and migrants.

Currently under the Bureau are the Emerging Infections Program, the Office of Immigrant Health, and five centers: HIV Surveillance Epidemiology and Evaluation; Immunization; Surveillance, Infection Prevention, and Outbreak Response; Tuberculosis Prevention and Control; and Zoonotic and Vector-Borne Disease.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE PREVENTION & CARE SERVICES BUREAU

The Infectious Disease Prevention and Care Services Bureau started in July 2009, when the Office of Infectious Disease Prevention and Care Services was established within the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration. In July 2012, the Office became part of the Infectious Disease Bureau of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration. In April 2015, the Infectious Disease Bureau split, and the Office became the Infectious Disease Prevention and Care Services Bureau.

The Bureau is responsible for the Office of Faith-Based and Community Partnerships, the Maryland AIDS Drug Assistance Program, and the Center for Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention.


MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH BUREAU
Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201 - 2399

The Maternal and Child Health Bureau formed as the Center for Maternal and Child Health in January 2000 with the merger of the Office of Children's Health and the Office of Maternal Health and Family Planning. From July 2010 to July 2012, the Center was under Family Health Services. In July 2012, it moved to the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration under its present name.

The Office of Children's Health had been known as the Office of Child Health Services since 1989 when it was made part of the Local and Family Health Administration. In 1993, the Office reformed as the Office of Child Health. In 1994, the Office of Child Health and the Office of Children's Medical Services merged to form the Office of Child Health and Children's Medical Services. Renamed the Office of Children's Health in 1995, it became part of the Community and Public Health Administration in 1997 and joined the Family Health Administration in July 2001.

In 1922, the Office of Maternal Health and Family Planning originated as the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and Services to Crippled Children. The Bureau had become the Division of Maternal and Child Health under the Bureau of Preventive Medicine by 1951, under the Bureau of Preventive Medical Services by 1967, and under the Preventive Medicine Administration in 1969. The Division was renamed the Office of Maternal Health, Family Planning, and Hereditary Disorders by 1985. As the Office of Maternal and Child Health it was placed under the Family Health Administration in 1987. The Office joined the Local and Family Health Administration in 1989 and was renamed the Office of Maternal Health and Family Planning in 1990. As part of the Community and Public Health Administration since 1997, it transferred to the Family Health Administration in July 2001.

Since the merger of the Office of Children's Health with the Office of Maternal Health and Family Planning, the Center for Maternal and Child Health has worked to improve the health of women of childbearing age and their babies. With federal and State funds, the Center directs prenatal care and family planning services offered by local health departments and others. The Center also administers special grants to improve the reproductive health of adolescents and introduce new contraceptive techniques into the public health system.

For basic preventive services to safeguard the health of children, the Center administers State and federal funding to the local health department in each county and Baltimore City. These services include immunizations; screening for lead poisoning, vision, hearing and scoliosis; and counseling in basic nutrition. The Center also administers special grants, such as the grant to the University System of Maryland relating to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), or grants to Eastern Shore counties for preventive dental care for children. In addition, the Center offers training, consultation, and technical assistance to local health departments and the private sector.

For children whose chronic illnesses or disabling conditions interfere with normal growth and development, the Center helps families plan and obtain specialized medical and rehabilitative care. These conditions include cerebral palsy, orofacial anomalies, speech and language problems, spina bifida, heart disease and defects, hearing impairment, cystic fibrosis, chronic otitis media, chronic renal disease, and epilepsy. Many other diagnoses qualify a child to receive services if financial eligibility requirements also are met (Code of Maryland Regulations - COMAR 10.22.08.05B).

A joint federal, State and local program called Children's Medical Services, formerly Crippled Children's Services, is administered by the Center. While State funding for services to crippled children dates to at least 1922, the program has operated in Maryland since 1937 (Code Health-General Article, sec. 15-125).

Under the Bureau are four offices; Family Planning and Home Visiting; Genetics and People with Special Health Care Needs; Surveillance and Quality Initiatives; and Maryland Women, Infants, and Children Food Program.

OFFICE FOR GENETICS & PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS
Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201 - 2399

In 1964, the first programs of the Office for Genetics and People with Special Health Care Needs were initiated. These programs were assigned to the Division of Hereditary Disorders in 1973. Reorganized as the Office of Hereditary Disorders in 1990, the Office was placed under Family Health Services and Primary Care in 1997, and became the Office for Genetics and Children with Special Health Care Needs in March 2000. The Office functioned under the Family Health Administration from July 2001 to July 2012, when it received its present name and moved to the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration.

The Office works to improve the early identification of children with special health care needs through newborn screening for metabolic diseases, sicle cell disease, chronic diseases, birth defects, hearing loss, and developmental problems. The Office coordinates alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) testing to pregnant women; screens nearly every newborn baby in Maryland for birth defects; treats genetic metabolic diseases and hemoglobin disorders, including sickle cell disease; and provides clinical services for other genetic disorders.

The Birth Defects Reporting and Information System (BDRIS) is maintained by the Office. The System collects data and provides information to parents of children with disorders and defects. Educational programs on genetics and genetic services are offered by the Office to health professionals, educators, and the general public. The Office also ensures that children receive timely specialized medical care and family support services.

OFFICE OF MARYLAND WOMEN, INFANTS & CHILDREN FOOD PROGRAM
Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building, 201 West Preston St., Baltimore, MD 21201 - 2399

Created by the Department in 1985, the Office of Maryland Women, Infants and Children Food Program joined the Family Health Administration in 1987. That administration was renamed the Local and Family Health Administration in 1989, the Community and Public Health Administration in 1997, and again the Family Health Administration in July 2001. The Office became part of the Prevention and Health Promotion Administration in July 2012.

Maryland Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). The Program offers health and nutrition services, including supplemental foods, to pregnant, postpartum and breast-feeding women; infants up to one year of age; and children until their fifth birthday. To be eligible, an individual also must meet income requirements and be at nutritional risk.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Program is administered by the Office of Maryland Women, Infants and Children Food Program through grants to eighteen local agencies that serve the entire State. Each local agency determines recipient eligibility, prescribes individualized food packages, provides nutrition education, prepares required records and reports, and issues food instruments (negotiable checks used in exchange for approved foods). The Office ensures that Maryland's program accords with federal requirements (P.L. 95-627).

The Office is assisted by the Maryland Women, Infants and Children Advisory Council.


VITAL STATISTICS ADMINISTRATION

4201 Patterson Ave., 5th floor, Baltimore, MD 21215

In November 1998, the Vital Statistics Administration started from divisions formerly under the General Services Administration. At that time, the Division of Health Statistics and the Division of Vital Records were placed under the Administration. Formerly under Operations, the Vital Statistics Administration moved to Public Health Services in February 2011.

The Administration registers all births, deaths, and fetal deaths that occur in Maryland. It issues certified copies of birth, death and marriage certificates, and provides verification of divorces. Further, the Administration compiles and analyzes vital statistics data; prepares annual population estimates by age, race, sex, and geographical subdivisions; compiles reports on vital statistics and population; and makes its data available to government agencies and the public.

The work of the Administration is performed by two divisions: Health Statistics, and Vital Records.

DIVISION OF HEALTH STATISTICS

4201 Patterson Ave., 5th floor, Baltimore, MD 21215

Functions of the Division of Health Statistics began in 1951 as part of the Division of Vital Records and Statistics under the Department of Health. By 1959, the work of vital statistics was placed under the Division of Research and Planning. By 1961, it was found under the Office of Planning and Research and, by 1963, was part of the Division of Statistical Research and Records. In 1967, it formed separately as the Division of Biostatistics under the Bureau of Analysis and Records. In 1969, the Division became the Center for Health Statistics and, by 1973, was placed under the Office of General Administration. The Center reorganized as a division in 1988.

Annually, the Division of Health Statistics publishes vital statistics and population estimates for the State. To highlight significant trends and findings, the Division analyzes and reports annually on the health status of Maryland residents. It provides statistical analysis and advice to programs on studies and systems development. The Division publishes annual and special reports on these topics.

DIVISION OF VITAL RECORDS

Reisterstown Road Plaza, 6764-B Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, MD 21215 - 2299

The Division of Vital Records organized in 1910 as the Bureau of Vital Statistics under the State Department of Health (Chapter 560, Acts of 1910). In 1951, it reformed as the Division of Vital Records and Statistics and, in 1967, as the Division of Vital Records under the Bureau of Analysis and Records. In 1969, the Division was placed under the Center for Health Statistics. In 1988, the Division was separated from Health Statistics.

Copies of certified birth, death, and marriage certificates and divorce verification are issued by the Division. All births, deaths, marriages, and divorces that occur in the State also are registered with the Division. Copies of birth and death records are issued to authorized persons for a fee of $10 for the first certified copy (checks to be made payable to Department of Health and Mental Hygiene). Application for certified copies may be made in person, by mail or online. Verification of identity is required to ensure the applicant is authorized to receive a certificate. Commemorative birth certificates also may be ordered from the Division for a fee of $50.

Birth and Death Records. The Division has birth and death records for Baltimore City from January 1, 1875, and for the twenty-three counties of Maryland from August 1898. The information also is available from the State Archives.

Marriage and Divorce Records. State marriage registration began on June 1, 1951, and divorce registration began in June 1961. Copies of marriage records prior to January 1, 1990 may be obtained from the Circuit Court clerk in the county where the marriage occurred, or from the State Archives. For a fee of $12, the Division issues certified copies of marriage certificates for marriages occurring after January 1, 1990, and official verification of divorces and annulments occurring after January 1, 1992.


OFFICE OF CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER

Forensic Medical Center, 900 West Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21202

The Office of Chief Medical Examiner oversees a network of local deputy medical examiners and forensic investigators who investigate violent and suspicious deaths, and deaths unattended by physicians. These duties had been the responsibility first of local sheriffs, and then of local coroners from 1666 to the end of the nineteenth century. Then, they were assumed by justices of the peace. In 1939, these functions were assigned to deputy medical examiners (Chapter 369, Acts of 1939).

Any death that occurs by violence, suicide, casualty, or in any suspicious or unusual manner, or a sudden death in which the deceased was in good health or unattended by a physician is required by law to be investigated (Code Health-General Article, sec. 5-309). In the event of such a death, the local police or sheriff will notify the appropriate State's Attorney and a local medical examiner or forensic investigator authorized by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner to investigate deaths in that jurisdiction. The investigator proceeds to the scene of death to take charge of the body; investigates the medical cause of death; takes possession of any property found on the body; collects the names and addresses of witnesses; obtains photographs; preserves any evidence; and writes a detailed report to be submitted to the Office.

With the State Postmortem Examiners Commission, the Chief Medical Examiner may appoint physicians as deputy medical examiners and forensic investigators in each county. The deputy medical examiners file with the Office of Chief Medical Examiner reports of all deaths investigated. Records of the Office are open for inspection to the family of the deceased and are acceptable in court as evidence of the facts contained.

The Chief Medical Examiner performs autopsies and provides the local state's attorney with copies of records concerning any death which requires further investigation. Appointed by the State Postmortem Examiners Commission, the Chief Medical Examiner oversees Administration, Autopsy Services, Statewide Services, Toxicology, and the Center for the Study of Health Effects of Fire.

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF HEALTH EFFECTS OF FIRE
Forensic Medical Center, 900 West Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21202

The Center for the Study of the Health Effects of Fire was created in 1988 (Chapter 185, Acts of 1988). The Center studies the health effects of exposure to fire; gathers and analyzes data on fire-related injury or death; and maintains both a registry of persons who suffer fire-related injury or death, and a computerized database concerning injuries and health effects of fire. For information routinely collected about fires, the Center is a repository. Information collected by the Center and intended for use in research, however, is confidential and not discoverable or admissible as evidence in a civil or criminal action to determine cause of death or liability for injury or death.

Pilot studies on issues or factors affecting injuries from or the health effects of fire are funded by the Center which also applies for federal or private research grants to investigate such issues. In addition, the Center communicates with national scientific data bases on toxicology, chemistry, epidemiology, and related scientific disciplines; collaborates with agencies, such as the National Bureau of Standards, that are involved in programs related to health effects of fire; and promotes interest in fire-related issues at educational institutions in Maryland (Code Health-General Article, secs. 18-701 through 18-711).

TOXICOLOGY


OFFICE OF PREPAREDNESS & RESPONSE

300 West Preston St., Suite 202, Baltimore, MD 21201 - 2308

In April 2004, the Office of Preparedness and Response began as Emergency Preparedness and Response to coordinate Departmental response to any hazardous health situations, including natural disasters, such as blizzards and hurricanes, as well as biological, chemical or nuclear incidents. In February 2006, Emergency Preparedness and Response merged with the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. The Office had been established under the Community Health Administration in October 2002 to upgrade Maryland's readiness and response capability for public health threats and emergencies, such as bioterrorism and infectious disease outbreaks. The merger formed the Office of Preparedness and Response in February 2006.

The Office of Preparedness and Response plans for rapid mobilization of public health personnel, and ensures that they are organized, trained, and equipped for all types of hazards. The Office coordinates the Maryland Professional Volunteer Corps, trained health care professionals who provide emergency care during catastrophic events. The Office also is responsible for the Department's Emergency Management Team. On-call 24 hours a day, the Team responds to any health emergency such as a natural disaster, or act of bioterrorism.


STATE ANATOMY BOARD

c/o University of Maryland School of Medicine
655 West Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201

Authorized in 1947, the State Anatomy Board was organized in 1949 (Chapter 669, Acts of 1947). The Board's purpose is to ensure the proper distribution of cadavers to qualified hospitals, medical schools, and other agencies engaged in medical education and research. Bodies are distributed equitably to the anatomy department of each medical school in Maryland. The Board also carries out the legal provisions regulating Consent to Post Mortem Examination (Chapter 315, Acts of 1961) and the Anatomical Gift Act (Chapter 467, Acts of 1968).

The Board consists of two representatives from each of the departments of anatomy of medical schools in the State of Maryland and one representative of the Department of Anatomy of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Members of the Board are designated by the administrative officers of each school (Code Health-General Article, secs. 5-401 through 5-409).

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