Archives of Maryland
(Biographical Series)

JAMES S. OWENS, c. 1802-1866

Treasurer of the Western Shore, 1843-1844
State Treasurer, 1852-1854

James S. Owens was born ca. 1802, probably in Anne Arundel County, the son of Isaac and Rebecca (Swett) Owens.

He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the University of Maryland in 1823. He made his home in Anne Arundel County, where in 1825 he married Eliza Ann Welch (1807-1851), daughter of Robert Welch of Ben (1778-1866), a member of the House of Delegates from 1838-1839, and his wife Patty (Sellman) Welch. In 1853 Owens married Elizabeth (ca. 1822-1896), widow of Edward Dorsey (1805-1852), and daughter of Beale M. and Elizabeth R. Worthington.

By 1831 Owens had purchased 220 acres in southern Anne Arundel County thus becoming both farmer and physician. He served as a county commissioner in 1839 and represented Anne Arundel County in the House of Delegates in 1839, 1841, 1842, and 1847. James S. Owens was Treasurer of the Western Shore from 1843 to 1844; he was the first State Treasurer from 1852 until 1854.

Owens moved to Baltimore City where he lived on St. Paul Street. He died there on March 5, 1866. A funeral mass was held at St. Ignatius Church, Baltimore. He was survived by his widow and four children: George A.W. (ca. 1827-?), a physician, Mary (ca. 1831-?), Henry (ca. 1833-?), and Robert D. (ca. 1843-?).


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